Weight training for children and teens

Over the past number of years since weight training has become popular, there has been a divide on whether it’s healthy or not for children to partake in resistance training.

Pre-Puberty weight training/resistance training

Heavy Lifting can put too much strain on young muscles, tendons and growth plates, especially when proper technique is sacrificed, in favour of lifting larger amounts of weight says Edward Laskowski M.D, a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist at the Mayo Clinic, Minnesota.

In that case it would make much more sense to, instead, focus on a specific strength training program for a child, rather than focusing on anything remotely connected to weightlifting, bodybuilding or powerlifting. These specialised types of training can be implemented when a child has reached puberty and the body has developed a reasonable level of strength.

Is it safe for children to weight train?

According to both the American College of sports medicine(ACSM) and the National strength and conditioning Association (NSCA) pre-pubescent children can safely engage in resistance training, with certain limitations;

* They should be mature enough to respond to coaching advice.

* Weight training should only form part of their exercise regime, other sports and activities should also be included.

* They should avoid maximal lifts opting for more reps with a lighter weight.

* Perfect technique and supervised at all times.

There are many different benefits to your child partaking in weight/resistance exercise.

* Increased Muscle, strength and endurance.

* Sports performance improvement.

* Better cardio respiratory function

* Help to protect the child’s muscles and joints from injury associated with other activities.

* Stronger bones

If you would like to speak to us about strength training for your children or teens, give us a shout on 01 8534091 or email info@theedgeclontarf.com.